Wahoo from New Jersey

As one of the fastest fish in the ocean, wahoo are long, beautifully striped fish, dark steel blue along their back, fading to a silvery-blue belly with vertical iridescent lines along their torso. Their large mouths are filled with compact, finely serrated triangular teeth, a characteristic that compliments their impressive speed when hunting. They mainly feed on fish such as herring, frigate mackerel, and butterfish, but also squid. Much of the commercial catch of wahoo comes from the Pacific, mainly Hawaii, though much of our supply is caught right here off the east coast, many times the coast of New Jersey. Wahoo is generally a bycatch of longlining boats, out to catch swordfish and tuna. They usually swim alone or in small, loose packs of a few fish, but rarely in large schools.

Wahoo populations have the ability to mature into spawning adults and reproduce rapidly (about 1 year), much like mahi-mahi populations. Recreational and commercial catches involve proper permitting and harvest limits, though there are no formal stock assessments for the species because their populations are believed to be so high. Wahoo continues to thrive within these management boundaries, a well-balanced relationship between fish and fishermen.

Pictured here is Frederico on our production team, unloading a recent fresh delivery of wahoo from southern New Jersey.

A close relative of king mackerel, the meat of wahoo is lighter in color and milder in flavor, with a large, circular flake. Wahoo is also known by its Hawaiian name "ono," meaning good to eat, or delicious. It cooks up white and is great baked or grilled, also very popularly used in fish tacos.

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