Featured

Black Sea Bass

$19.95

Origin: Wild Caught, product of USA

More Details →

Swordfish

$19.95

Origin: Wild Caught, product of USA

More Details →

Branzino

$10.95

Origin: Farmed, product of Spain

More Details →

Cod

$14.95

Origin: Wild Caught

More Details →

News

Wreckfish from South Carolina

The Atlantic wreckfish resembles a grouper or bass, and inhabits deep waters of the Eastern Seaboard’s continental shelf, as well as other waters internationally. Though they can be found from the Grand Banks to Argentina, most commercial landings are from the Charleston Bump, located about 90 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. The Charlston bump is a series of overhangs, cliffs, dropoffs and caves that allow wreckfish to hide while hunting for fish exploring the dark, cool waters just outside the Gulf Stream. A cloudy, reflective layer behind their eyes allows them to be super-sensitive to light, able to ambush prey who can’t see as well in the depths of dark water (up to 3,300 feet).

A 30lb wreckfish and fillet.

The U.S. wreckfish fishery is possibly the most sustainable fishery in the world. There are less than 10 boats with commercial wreckfish licenses, and each boat is issued a specific quota for the entire year. Fisherman are limited to using bandit rigs, which are large hydraulic reels that send a vertical cable line and multiple baited circle hooks nearly 1,500 feet to the bottom. This creates a very selective method of fishing that results in nearly zero environmental impact or bycatch. Wreckfish also have no known predators.

Most wreckfish are between 20 and 60 pounds, but can reach weights of well over 200 pounds. This average large size helps create thick, meaty fillets and impressive portions. The meat of wreckfish is much like grouper -- firm, white, and mild with large flakes. The cold, deep water they live in also imparts a clean, slightly sweet taste to the fillet.

 

Read more

Local Brook Trout from Rural Pennsylvania

Looking for an affordable, local option for seafood from a small-scale farm? You've found it.


By being raised in a small and naturally-powered setting, the carbon footprint to produce each fish is notably lower than others in the aquaculture industry. The Preserve has positioned itself to not only offer some of the best farmed rainbow trout available on the market today, but is also a substantial part of a local economy that we’re proud to support, being only a few hours drive from New York City.
Our brook trout come from the Limestone Springs Preserve -- a local, high-quality trout farm in Lebenon County Pennsylvania. The trout are raised in long concrete troughs, or “runs,” with pristine spring water that flows through them from the Preserve’s adjacent 19th century limestone quarry. This system is gravity-powered, with minimal electricity required to keep the freshwater flowing for the growing trout. Used water flows out of the runs and into a manmade settling basin where waste and sediment settle. The water is then cleaned and filtered slowly and carefully, then continuing down the Tulpehocken Creek. This flow-through system allows for a natural, clean habitat, and is very different than the general water recycling system primarily used in fish farming. The trout at Limestone Springs Preserve are fed a high-grade, sustainable feed, and mature for 20 months, or until they reach about 12 inches in length. The runs are then thoroughly cleaned and power-washed, and then the process begins again with small trout that have been hatched and raised from fry on the same property.

In addition to the raceways where the trout are raised, the Limestone Springs Preserve also offers a pay-to-fish pond, where at any time of year, anyone can catch as many rainbow trout as they want without needing to have a Pennsylvania fishing license. Whatever you catch you must keep -- fish that are caught are purchased by the pound. This unique opportunity gives anyone the chance to easily catch and taste these delicious fish.

Want to try some at home? Available by the fillet, whole, or butterfly-cut, any of these are easily made into a flavorful, healthy meal. Trout pair well with garlic or citrus, and are very affordable. Be sure to check out this product on our store by clicking here. 

Read more

East Coast Swordfish

While Atlantic swordfish can be caught domestically as far as off the coast of Texas in the Gulf of Mexico, we source most of our swordfish from the mid-Atlantic here on the East Coast. In the late 1990’s, fishery management policies were put in place to rebuild depleted swordfish populations. For a number of years now, the local east coast population has been reliably increasing and in 2013, was declared to be over target levels by 14%. Atlantic swordfish have been an incredible fishery management success story over the last 20 years.

As their name implies, swordfish have a long, flattened bill that looks like a sword, which is used mainly to stun and injure prey in the water while swimming at speeds of up to 50mph. Commercial fishermen set a long line of hooks (about 40 miles) overnight with glowsticks attached, which attract small fish and squid, and in turn, swordfish. The commercial longline fishery has minimal environmental impact, since the line rests only in the water column. It also uses advanced technology like sonar and GPS, as well as specifically developed gear to avoid contact with animals like turtles and dolphins.

Swordfish is just one of those fish that really has no equal. With a dense, steak-like texture that is moist and hearty with a mild savory flavor and a high fat content, it’s nearly impossible to find someone who wouldn’t enjoy eating it. Its dense, steak-like texture is fatty and delicious, perfect for the grill. Try some out this weekend! It's available by the pound here on our website, shipped overnight to you fresh, never frozen.

Read more